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How to File Bankruptcy in Alabama

Filing for bankruptcy in Alabama can be overwhelming–but it doesn’t have to be.

Facing financial challenges is a part of life. But if you’re one of the millions struggling financially due to a job loss, illness, or another event in Alabama, bankruptcy was created to help. Here, you’ll find an explanation of Chapters 7 and 13, how to file for bankruptcy, and that you don’t have to do it alone. 

Of course, it is important to remember that bankruptcy is a complicated law that can be confusing without a professional bankruptcy attorney’s proper guidance and necessary advice. If you are an Auburn or Opelika, Alabama resident, contact the bankruptcy attorneys at David S. Clark today!

DISCLAIMER: The following blog post is just advice, and you will be better served to call David S. Clark with your bankruptcy questions. This blog contains helpful tips and advice, but is not professional legal advice, and shouldn’t treated as such.

Need Bankruptcy Help? Call David S. Clark

What’s the Difference Between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy is also known as “Entitled Liquidation.” This means that a court supervised trustee takes over the assets of a debtor’s estate, turns them into cash (liquidates them), then distributes funds to creditors. In Chapter 7 the debtor has rights to make certain assets exempt.

Since the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 those seeking Chapter 7 Bankruptcy must undergo a “means test” to determine whether or not they qualify. There are income thresholds throughout Alabama that, if a debtor exceeds, will disqualify the debtor from being able to declare Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy is also known as a “Wage Earner’s Plan”. This is usually a more desirable avenue for debt relief than Chapter 7 because it enables a customer to keep certain valuable assets out of a creditor’s reach. The debtor then proposes a plan with a help of a bankruptcy attorney to repay creditors over a reasonable period of time.

Will Filing Bankruptcy in Alabama Erase My Debts?

Bankruptcy has the ability to wipe out many types of dischargeable debts. When you receive your discharge at the end of your case, you are no longer legally required to pay any of these debts and creditors cannot come after you to collect them. These typically include:

  • Credit Card Debt
  • Medical Bills
  • Payments on Motor Vehicles
  • House Payments
  • Debts Related to Your Business
  • Personal Loans

But you can’t discharge all debts. Nondischargeable debts, like student loans, child support, fines, and taxes, will not be included in your bankruptcy discharge. Ultimately, dischargeable debts exist because the benefit to a creditor and society as a whole outweighs the benefit that the debtor would gain if their debts were completely discharged. 

Hiring a Bankruptcy Lawyer in Alabama

With the extensive paperwork, financial documentation, laws, and Alabama procedures present in a bankruptcy filing, hiring an experienced bankruptcy attorney to represent you in bankruptcy is very important.

With over 25 years of combined experience, the attorneys at David S. Clark are here to help any Auburn or Opelika resident navigate through bankruptcy. For more information on how you can find financial peace through bankruptcy, contact David S. Clark today!

DISCLAIMER: The above blog post is just advice, and you will be better served to call David S. Clark with your bankruptcy questions. This blog contains helpful tips and advice, but is not professional legal advice, and shouldn’t treated as such.

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